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Wealth Management

Your needs

Protect family assets

Protect family assets. You are:

Your hard work and good planning have made it possible to live the life you always dreamed: surrounded by loved ones, enjoying the freedom to choose your lifestyle - which is a freedom you hope to give them too.

To increase the value of your inheritance
You've planned out an effective investment strategy to leave your loved ones an inheritance, but did you know that by including insurance in your strategy you could leave them even more?

With the Lasting Legacy Integrated Solution, you can protect your assets and, when you pass on, leave an even bigger tax-free inheritance to your loved ones.

Personalized advices
This strategy gives you the combined benefit of a Wealth Management advisor working side-by-side with a Desjardins Insurance financial security advisor.* Together, they'll find the integrated solution that works best for you so you can achieve your financial goals.

* Employee of Desjardins Financial Security, Financial Services Firm. Desjardins Insurance refers to Desjardins Financial Security Life Assurance Company, a provider of life and health insurance and retirement savings products.

Savings and investments

  • Diversify your investments to get the most of varying returns and maturity dates of different asset classes.
  • Make taxation of non-registered investments work in your favour.
  • Postpone taxation of your investments until your tax rate is lower.
  • Incorporate in your portfolio assets that protect you against inflation (e.g., infrastructure investments, real estate).
  • Be extremely cautious when giving personal guarantees or endorsements.
  • Insure your loans.

Personal property

  • Draw up an inventory of personal property.
  • Maintain adequate insurance coverage.
  • Take out additional insurance on high value items (e.g., collections, jewellery, musical instruments).

Civil liability

  • Review your liability insurance coverage annually.
  • If you are a residential or commercial rental property owner, know that special rules apply.
  • If you travel abroad, learn about the risks and how to limit them.

Life and health

  • Purchase additional coverage to top up your group insurance plan as needed to maintain stability if you change jobs
    • Take out enough life insurance to protect your family’s lifestyle and reduce the fiscal burden when you die.
    • Protect yourself against the financial consequences of a critical illness.
    • Give yourself the means to stay in control of decisions affecting you in case of loss of independence.
  • When you retire, extend your employer-provided insurance coverage if possible.
  • Put aside an emergency fund equivalent to 3 months’ expenses.
  • If you travel, get adequate insurance coverage considering:
    • agreements between the country you’re visiting and RAMQ
    • your private insurance policy limits

Long-term disability or incapacity

  • Take charge of your financial obligations in case of accident or disability:
    • Select Disability Income1: to offset a loss of income due to disability (non-taxable monthly income)
  • Draw up a living will so that any end-of-life decisions are made in keeping with your last wishes.
  • Prepare a mandate in case of incapacity to see to the protection of your interests by designating:
    • a reliable person to administer your property
    • a family member or second person to attend to your physical well-being
  • If you travel or reside abroad for lengthy periods of time, make sure these important documents will be honoured.

Writing up a will

  • Maintain family harmony by being fair to your heirs.
  • Learn about bequests and their features before making a final decision.
  • Take your children's needs and difficulties into account.
  • Keep the family fortune safe from your heirs' financial problems.
  • Revise your will on a regular basis to account for:
    • your property and any appreciation
    • your and your heirs' personal situation
    • the possibility that your executor may die, become incapacitated or express a lack of interest in fulfilling the task

Estate settlement

  • Make it easy for your family and executor to respect your final wishes.
  • Choose a reliable executor by assessing the skills required to manage your assets throughout the process.
  • Name a second executor, in case he or she dies before you.
  • Think about hiring a firm as executor if you have a complex financial or family situation.
  • Prepare an estate plan and keep all appropriate documents (investment accounts, life insurance policies) with it.
  • Turn to testamentary trusts, not only for their tax benefits but also to control the use of assets distributed.

Inheritance and minor children

  • Designate a guardian to look after your children until they reach the age of majority, or the time they can access life insurance funds.
  • Set up a testamentary trust on their behalf to manage the use of assets and use tax leveraging.

Assets and heirs outside Quebec

  • Learn about estate settlement and distribution rules in the jurisdictions concerned.
  • Assume that a will written in French in Quebec will not be considered and that heirs will have to assume translation costs.
  • To avoid difficulties, make a valid will in the jurisdiction in which your property is located.
  • Be aware that transferring assets outside an estate (e.g., joint ownership, inter vivos trusts, life insurance policy with designated beneficiary) can reduce, if not eliminate probate fees abroad, which are calculated on the estate value.

Marriage and civil union

  • In Quebec, in the event of divorce or separation, assets are split:
    • first, according the rules governing the sharing of family assets (includes the family's principal residence, vehicles, pension plans and RRSPs accumulated during the marriage or civil union)
    • then, according to the matrimonial regime selected: partnership of acquests or separation as to property
  • In the event of death, sharing family assets precedes the distribution of property outlined in the will.

De facto unions

  • The Civil Code of Québec only recognizes marriage and civil unions. The dissolution of a de facto union does not grant entitlement to:
    • sharing family assets
    • alimony
    • sharing pension funds
  • To protect yourself and avoid costly legal proceedings, de facto spouses should write up a cohabitation contract clearly stipulating the terms by which property will be divided in case of a breakup.

Professional activities

  • Consider incorporating or creating a protective trust to separate company assets from your own to exempt them, with certain conditions, from lawsuits or seizure.
  • Put some asset in your spouse's name.
  • Maintain an appropriate amount of professional liability coverage or take out group insurance from a professional organization.
  • Be cautious when giving personal guarantees to finance professional activities.
  • Establish a succession plan in case of illness.
  • Find a partner or associate who can take over your business or clientele.

Savings and investments

  • Diversify your investments to get the most of varying returns and maturity dates of different asset classes.
  • Make taxation of non-registered investments work in your favour.
  • Postpone taxation of your investments until your tax rate is lower.
  • Incorporate in your portfolio assets that protect you against inflation (e.g., infrastructure investments, real estate).
  • Be extremely cautious when giving personal guarantees or endorsements.
  • Insure your loans.

Personal property

  • Draw up an inventory of personal property.
  • Maintain adequate insurance coverage.
  • Take out additional insurance on high value items (e.g., collections, jewellery, musical instruments).

Civil liability

  • Review your liability insurance coverage annually.
  • If you are a residential or commercial rental property owner, be aware that know that special rules apply.
  • If you travel abroad, learn about the risks and how to limit them.

Life and health

  • Take out enough life insurance to protect your family’s lifestyle and reduce the fiscal burden when you die.
  • Protect yourself against the financial consequences of a critical illness.
  • Give yourself the means to stay in control of decisions affecting you in case of loss of independence.
  • Put aside an emergency fund equivalent to 3 months’ expenses.
  • If you travel, get adequate insurance coverage considering:
    • agreements between the country you’re visiting and RAMQ
    • your private insurance policy limits

Long-term disability or incapacity

  • Take charge of your financial obligations in case of accident or disability:
    • Select Disability Income1: to offset a loss of income due to disability (non-taxable monthly income)
    • Select Business Expense1: to cover regular business expenses (rent, heating, business tax, etc.)
  • Draw up a living will so that any end-of-life decisions are made in keeping with your last wishes.
  • Prepare a mandate in case of incapacity to see to the protection of your interests by designating:
    • a reliable person to administer your property
    • a family member or second person to attend to your physical well-being
  • If you travel or reside abroad for lengthy periods of time, make sure these important documents will be honoured.

Writing up a will

  • Name an executor able to manage your professional assets and contracts.
  • Maintain family harmony by being fair to your heirs.
  • Learn about bequests and their features before making a final decision.
  • Learn about bequests and their features before making a final decision.
  • Keep the family fortune safe from your heirs' financial problems.
  • Revise your will on a regular basis to account for:
    • your property and any appreciation
    • your and your heirs' personal situation
    • the possibility that your executor may die, become incapacitated or express a lack of interest in fulfilling the task

Estate settlement

  • Remember to take into account the cost of closing out your business.
  • Make it easy for your family and executor to respect your final wishes.
  • Choose a reliable executor by assessing the skills required to manage your assets throughout the process.
  • Name a second executor, in case he or she dies before you.
  • Think about hiring a firm as executor if you have a complex financial or family situation.
  • Prepare an estate plan and keep all appropriate documents (investment accounts, life insurance policies) with it.
  • Turn to testamentary trusts, not only for their tax benefits but also to control the use of assets distributed.

Inheritance and minor children

  • Designate a guardian to look after your children until they reach the age of majority, or the time they can access life insurance funds.
  • Set up a testamentary trust on their behalf to manage the use of assets and use tax leveraging.

Assets and heirs outside Quebec

  • Learn about estate settlement and distribution rules in the jurisdictions concerned.
  • Assume that a will written in French in Quebec will not be considered and that heirs will have to assume translation costs.
  • To avoid difficulties, make a valid will in the jurisdiction in which your property is located.
  • Be aware that transferring assets outside an estate (e.g., joint ownership, inter vivos trusts, life insurance policy with designated beneficiary) can reduce, if not eliminate probate fees abroad, which are calculated on the estate value.

Marriage and civil union

  • In Quebec, in the event of divorce or separation, assets are split:
    • first, according the rules governing the sharing of family assets (includes the family's principal residence, vehicles, pension plans and RRSPs accumulated during the marriage or civil union)
    • then, according to the matrimonial regime selected: partnership of acquests or separation as to property
  • In the event of death, sharing family assets precedes the distribution of property outlined in the will.

De facto unions

  • The Civil Code of Québec only recognizes marriage and civil unions. The dissolution of a de facto union does not grant entitlement to:
    • sharing family assets
    • alimony
    • sharing pension funds
  • To protect yourself and avoid costly legal proceedings, de facto spouses should write up a cohabitation contract clearly stipulating the terms by which property will be divided in case of a breakup.

Employment- based benefits

  • Check to see that your employment contract gives you adequate insurance coverage with regards to your income.
  • Negotiate your severance terms and compensation.
  • Make sure an old employer cannot prevent you from being able to earn a living in your area of expertise.

Professional liability

  • Don't forget that as a corporate director, you could be exposed to personal liability.
  • Maintain an appropriate amount of professional liability coverage or take out group insurance from a professional organization.

Savings and investments

  • Diversify your investments to get the most of varying returns and maturity dates of different asset classes.
  • Make taxation of non-registered investments work in your favour.
  • Postpone taxation of your investments until your tax rate is lower.
  • Incorporate in your portfolio assets that protect you against inflation (e.g., infrastructure investments, real estate).
  • Be extremely cautious when giving personal guarantees or endorsements.
  • Insure your loans.

Personal property

  • Draw up an inventory of personal property.
  • Maintain adequate insurance coverage.
  • Take out additional insurance on high value items (e.g., collections, jewellery, musical instruments).

Civil liability

  • Review your liability insurance coverage annually.
  • If you are a residential or commercial rental property owner, be aware that know that special rules apply.
  • If you travel abroad, learn about the risks and how to limit them.

Life and health

  • Take out enough life insurance to protect your family’s lifestyle and reduce the fiscal burden when you die.
  • Protect yourself against the financial consequences of a critical illness.
  • Give yourself the means to stay in control of decisions affecting you in case of loss of independence.
  • When you retire, extend the health and disability coverage offered by your employer if possible.
  • Put aside an emergency fund equivalent to 3 months’ expenses.
  • If you travel, get adequate insurance coverage considering:
    • agreements between the country you’re visiting and RAMQ
    • your private insurance policy limits

Long-term disability or incapacity

  • Take charge of your financial obligations in case of accident or disability:
    • Select Disability Income1: to offset a loss of income due to disability (non-taxable monthly income)
    • Select Business Expense1: to cover regular business expenses (rent, heating, business tax, etc.)
  • Draw up a living will so that any end-of-life decisions are made in keeping with your last wishes.
  • Prepare a mandate in case of incapacity to see to the protection of your interests by designating:
    • a reliable person to administer your property
    • a family member or second person to attend to your physical well-being
  • If you travel or reside abroad for lengthy periods of time, make sure these important documents will be honoured.

Writing up a will

  • Maintain family harmony by being fair to your heirs.
  • Learn about bequests and their features before making a final decision.
  • Take your children's needs and difficulties into account.
  • Keep the family fortune safe from your heirs' financial problems.
  • Revise your will on a regular basis to account for:
    • your property and any appreciation
    • your and your heirs' personal situation
    • the possibility that your executor may die, become incapacitated or express a lack of interest in fulfilling the task

Estate settlement

  • Make sure your executor can collect any amounts due to you in your employment contract.
  • Make it easy for your family and executor to respect your final wishes.
  • Choose a reliable executor by assessing the skills required to manage your assets throughout the process.
  • Name a second executor, in case he or she dies before you.
  • Think about hiring a firm as executor if you have a complex financial or family situation.
  • Prepare an estate plan and keep all appropriate documents (investment accounts, life insurance policies) with it.
  • Turn to testamentary trusts, not only for their tax benefits but also to control the use of assets distributed.

Inheritance and minor children

  • Designate a guardian to look after your children until they reach the age of majority, or the time they can access life insurance funds.
  • Set up a testamentary trust on their behalf to manage the use of assets and use tax leveraging.
  • Assets and heirs outside Quebec

  • Learn about estate settlement and distribution rules in the jurisdictions concerned.
  • Assume that a will written in French in Quebec will not be considered and that heirs will have to assume translation costs.
  • To avoid difficulties, make a valid will in the jurisdiction in which your property is located.
  • Be aware that transferring assets outside an estate (e.g., joint ownership, inter vivos trusts, life insurance policy with designated beneficiary) can reduce, if not eliminate probate fees abroad, which are calculated on the estate value.

Marriage and civil union

  • In Quebec, in the event of divorce or separation, assets are split:
    • first, according the rules governing the sharing of family assets (includes the family's principal residence, vehicles, pension plans and RRSPs accumulated during the marriage or civil union)
    • then, according to the matrimonial regime selected: partnership of acquests or separation as to property
  • In the event of death, sharing family assets precedes the distribution of property outlined in the will.

De facto unions

  • The Civil Code of Québec only recognizes marriage and civil unions. The dissolution of a de facto union does not grant entitlement to:
    • sharing family assets
    • alimony
    • sharing pension funds
  • To protect yourself and avoid costly legal proceedings, de facto spouses should write up a cohabitation contract clearly stipulating the terms by which property will be divided in case of a breakup.
  • Company value
    • Ensure the status of your company doesn't affect your personal wealth.
    • Keep your personal assets safe from seizure by creditors.
    • Put some of the family assets in your spouse's name.
    • Transfer some assets into a trust to separate them from your own assets.
    • Check to see if your shareholder agreement:
      • allows you to resolve by means of negotiation any disputes that could jeopardize your business
      • includes solutions in the event of retirement, critical illness or death
      • provides mechanisms for business liquidation
      • facilitates and promotes the resolution of differences
    • Protect your company from the unexpected:
      • Purchase co-ownership insurance (premium sharing) to keep the business running smoothly should a shareholder die or become critically ill.
      • Plan to buy partners’ shares should they die or become incapacitated.
    • Limit your losses in the event of temporary cessation of operations (e.g., fire):
      • damage to inventory
      • salaries and overhead
      • taxes and interest on loans
  • Savings and investments
    • Diversify your investments to get the most of varying returns and maturity dates of different asset classes.
    • Make taxation of non-registered investments work in your favour.
    • Postpone taxation of your investments until your tax rate is lower.
    • Incorporate in your portfolio assets that protect you against inflation (e.g., infrastructure investments, real estate).
    • Be extremely cautious when giving personal guarantees or endorsements.
    • Insure your loans.
  • Personal property
    • Draw up an inventory of personal property.
    • Maintain adequate insurance coverage.
    • Take out additional insurance on high value items (e.g., collections, jewellery, musical instruments).
  • Civil liability
    • Review your liability insurance coverage annually.
    • If you are a residential or commercial rental property owner, be aware that know that special rules apply.
    • If you travel abroad, learn about the risks and how to limit them.

Health

  • Take out enough life insurance to protect your family’s lifestyle and reduce the fiscal burden when you die.
  • Protect your estate and retirement
    • Protect yourself against the financial consequences of a critical illness.
    • Give yourself the means to stay in control of decisions affecting you in case of loss of independence.
  • Put aside an emergency fund equivalent to 3 months’ expenses.
  • If you travel, get adequate insurance coverage considering:
    • agreements between the country you’re visiting and RAMQ
    • your private insurance policy limits
  • When you retire, extend the health and disability coverage offered by your employer if possible.

Long-term disability or incapacity

  • Take charge of your financial obligations in case of accident or disability:
    • Select Disability Income1: to offset a loss of income due to disability (non-taxable monthly income)
    • Select Business Expense1: to cover regular business expenses (rent, heating, business tax, etc.)
  • Draw up a living will so that any end-of-life decisions are made in keeping with your last wishes.
  • Prepare a mandate in case of incapacity to see to the protection of your interests by designating:
    • a reliable person to administer your property
    • a family member or second person to attend to your physical well-being
  • If you travel or reside abroad for lengthy periods of time, make sure these important documents will be honoured.

Writing up a will

  • Plan your business transfer in such a way as to reduce the tax consequences.
  • Maintain family harmony by being fair to your heirs.
  • Learn about bequests and their features before making a final decision.
  • Take your children's needs and difficulties into account.
  • Keep the family fortune safe from your heirs' financial problems.
  • Revise your will on a regular basis to account for:
    • your property and any appreciation
    • your and your heirs' personal situation
    • the possibility that your executor may die, become incapacitated or express a lack of interest in fulfilling the task

Estate settlement

  • Name an executor who can:
    • ensure business continuity, unless otherwise provided in the shareholder agreement
    • vote your shares on your behalf
  • Choose a reliable executor by specifying the skills required to manage your assets and company.
  • Make it easy for your family and executor to respect your final wishes.
  • Choose a reliable executor by assessing the skills required to manage your assets throughout the process.
  • Name a second executor, in case he or she dies before you.
  • Think about hiring a firm as executor if you have a complex financial or family situation.
  • Prepare an estate plan and keep all appropriate documents (investment accounts, life insurance policies) with it.
  • Turn to testamentary trusts, not only for their tax benefits but also to control the use of assets distributed.

Inheritance and minor children

  • Designate a guardian to look after your children until they reach the age of majority, or the time they can access life insurance funds.
  • Set up a testamentary trust on their behalf to manage the use of assets and use tax leveraging.

Assets and heirs outside Quebec

  • Learn about estate settlement and distribution rules in the jurisdictions concerned.
  • Assume that a will written in French in Quebec will not be considered and that heirs will have to assume translation costs.
  • To avoid difficulties, make a valid will in the jurisdiction in which your property is located.
  • Be aware that transferring assets outside an estate (e.g., joint ownership, inter vivos trusts, life insurance policy with designated beneficiary) can reduce, if not eliminate probate fees abroad, which are calculated on the estate value.

Marriage and civil union

  • In Quebec, in the event of divorce or separation, assets are split:
    • first, according the rules governing the sharing of family assets (includes the family's principal residence, vehicles, pension plans and RRSPs accumulated during the marriage or civil union)
    • then, according to the matrimonial regime selected: partnership of acquests or separation as to property
  • In the event of death, sharing family assets precedes the distribution of property outlined in the will.

De facto unions

  • The Civil Code of Québec only recognizes marriage and civil unions. The dissolution of a de facto union does not grant entitlement to:
    • sharing family assets
    • alimony
    • sharing pension funds
  • To protect yourself and avoid costly legal proceedings, de facto spouses should write up a cohabitation contract clearly stipulating the terms by which property will be divided in case of a breakup.

1. Product of Desjardins Financial Security Life Assurance Company, a provider of life and health insurance and retirement savings products.

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