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Wealth Management

Your needs

Plan your retirement

Plan your retirement. You are:

Investments and savings

  • Decide what you'll do:
    • travel
    • do volunteer or community work
    • take classes
    • do sports or leisure activities
    • move (e.g., to a condo, senior's home, cottage)
    • start a second career, become a consultant or work part-time
  • Don't underestimate some things:
    • Retirement span: this could be 15, 20 or 30 years, depending on your health and family history.
    • Health: Protect your ability to do the things you want to so by guarding against unforeseen events (e.g., critical illness, long-term care facility, home care, private clinics).
    • Return on your investments: protect your assets from inflation and market fluctuations.
    • Your spouse: How your spouse's lifestyle and uncertainty will influence your planning.
  • Income sources
    • Employer pension plans
      • Learn more about the annual benefits prescribed for your age at retirement.
      • Check whether benefits are integrated with the QPP.
      • Consider how the pension adjustment will affect your RRSP contributions.
      • If your employer plan is a defined contribution pension plan, your benefits aren't guaranteed and are subject to contributions and income.
    • Government plans
      • Québec Pension Plan (QPP)
      • Canada Pension Plan (CPP)
      • Old Age Security Pension (OAS)
    • Personal investments and assets
      • Calculate your investment income.
      • Add your net rental property income.
      • Consider the sale of some assets:
        • Rental property
        • Principal residence
        • Secondary residence or other
Income based on age at time of retirement
Age at time of retirement Québec Pension Plan or Canada Pension Plan Old Age Security Pension (depending on date of birth) Pension Plan
Before April 1958 May 1958 to January 1962 February 1962 or later
Under age 60 No
benefits
As per the terms of the pension plan
Between age 60 and 65 Reduced
benefits
No
benefits
At age 65 Prescribed
benefits
No
benefits
Between age 65 and 67 Increased
benefits
Prescribed
benefits
No
benefits
At age 67 Increased
benefits
Prescribed
benefits
After age 67 Increased
benefits
  • Expenses at retirement
    • If you belong to a professional order, sign up for the retiree health insurance plan. Don't let a disability ruin your plans.
    • Build a reserve for unexpected expenses (e.g., health care, specialized housing)
    • Allow for inflation and income taxes during your retirement.
  • Spread between income and expenses
    • A negative spread means you will have to supplement with:
      • your savings and investments
      • some of your personal assets (RRSP, RRIF, TFSA)
    • This budget exercise will let you know how much you'll need to save before you retire.
  • Optimize your portfolio long-term return potential.
    • Respect your investor profile.
    • Choose incremental investments to:
      • counter market fluctuations.
      • make your capital last beyond your retirement date.
    • Diversify your investments.
  • Choose turn-key investment solutions:
    • Chorus II Portfolios: good diversification in line with investor profile
    • SocieTerra Portfolios: socially responsible investing
    • Zenitude Guaranteed Portfolio: investment solution including capital 100% guaranteed at maturity and a return that is known at time of investment

You've been working on saving up and growing your investments for quite a while now so that down the road you'll be able to enjoy your retirement to the fullest.

Your careful planning should ensure your success but unfortunately, we can't predict who might get sick or suffer a loss of independence. Either situation could put your well-planned retirement at risk.

To optimize your investment strategy
Have you considered including insurance as part of your investment strategy? The Secure Your Retirement Dream Integrated Solution combines investment and insurance strategies - making it possible to protect your retirement goals through your RRSP strategies.

Personalized advices
This offer gives you the combined benefit of a Wealth Management advisor working side-by-side with a Desjardins Insurance financial security advisor.* Together, they'll find the integrated solution that works best for you so you can achieve your financial goals.

* Offer available in Quebec only.

  • Professional activities
    • Decide whether you will stop working gradually or at once.
    • Decide which activities you'll pursue when you retire.
  • Decide what you'll do:
    • travel
    • volunteer and community work
    • studies
    • sports and leisure
    • moving (e.g., to a condo, senior's home, cottage)
    • second career, consultation or part-time work
  • Don't underestimate certain things:
    • Retirement span: this could be 15, 20 or 30 years, depending on your health and family history
    • Health: Protect your ability to do the things you want to so by guarding against unforeseen events (e.g., critical illness, long-term care facility, home care, private clinics)
    • Return on your investments: protect your assets from inflation and market fluctuations
    • Your spouse: How your spouse's lifestyle and uncertainty will influence your planning.
  • Income sources
    • Working income
      • Your income is variable so it can't be used as the sole basis for calculation.
      • Consider that you will want to pursue your activities and maintain your lifestyle in retirement.
    • Government plans
      • Québec Pension Plan (QPP)
      • Canada Pension Plan (CPP)
      • Old Age Security Pension (OAS)
    • Personal investments and assets
      • Calculate your investment income.
      • Add your net rental property income.
      • Consider the sale of some assets:
        • Rental property
        • Principal residence
        • Secondary residence or other
Income based on age at time of retirement
Age at time of retirement Québec Pension Plan or Canada Pension Plan Old Age Security Pension (depending on date of birth) Pension Plan
Before April 1958 May 1958 to January 1962 February 1962 or later
Under age 60 No
benefits
As per the terms of the pension plan
Between age 60 and 65 Reduced
benefits
No
benefits
At age 65 Prescribed
benefits
No
benefits
Between age 65 and 67 Increased
benefits
Prescribed
benefits
No
benefits
At age 67 Increased
benefits
Prescribed
benefits
After age 67 Increased
benefits
  • Expenses at retirement
    • If you belong to a professional order, find out about the benefits offered by the retiree health insurance plan.
    • Build a reserve for unexpected expenses (e.g., health care, specialized housing)
    • Allow for inflation and income taxes during your retirement.
  • Spread between income and expenses
    • A negative spread means you will have to supplement with:
      • your savings and investments
      • some of your personal assets (RRSP, RRIF, TFSA)
    • This budget exercise will let you know how much you'll need to save before you retire.
  • Optimize your portfolio long-term return potential.
    • Respect your investor profile.
    • Choose incremental investments to:
      • counter market fluctuations.
      • make your capital last beyond your retirement date.
    • Diversify your investments.
  • Choose turn-key investment solutions:
    • Chorus II Portfolios: good diversification in line with investor profile
    • SocieTerra Portfolios: socially responsible investing
    • Zenitude Guaranteed Portfolio: investment solution including capital 100% guaranteed at maturity and a return that is known at time of investment
  • Take charge of your financial obligations in case of accident or disability:
    • Select Disability Income1: to offset a loss of income due to disability (non-taxable monthly income)
    • Select Business Expense1: to cover regular business expenses (rent, heating, business tax, etc.)
  • Purchase critical illness insurance to avoid dipping into your savings.
  • Safeguard your quality of life and financial independence in the event of loss of independence.
  • Decide what you'll do:
    • travel
    • volunteer and community work
    • studies
    • sports and leisure
    • moving (e.g., to a condo, senior's home, cottage)
    • second career, consultation or part-time work
  • Don't underestimate some things:
    • Retirement span: this could be 15, 20 or 30 years, depending on your health and family history.
    • Health: protect your ability to do the things you want to so by guarding against unforeseen events (e.g., critical illness, long-term care facility, home care, private clinics).
    • Return on your investments: protect your assets from inflation and market fluctuations.
    • Your spouse: how your spouse's lifestyle and uncertainty will influence your planning.
  • As a senior executive or partner, you have a high income, bonuses and an expense account.
  • These advantages aren't considered recurring income; be sure to consider this when budgeting for retirement.
  • Income sources
    • Individual pension plan
      • When you negotiate your working conditions, ask for access to an additional plan.
      • Learn about the Individual Pension Plan (IPP), a defined benefit pension plan for high income earners.
    • Severance transferable to RRSP
    • Employer pension plan
      • Bonuses and other benefits aren't used to calculate your pension.
      • Learn more about the annual benefits prescribed for your age at retirement.
      • Check whether benefits are integrated with the QPP.
      • Consider how the pension adjustment will affect your RRSP contributions.
      • If your employer plan is a defined contribution pension plan, your benefits aren't guaranteed and are subject to contributions and income.
    • Government plans
      • Québec Pension Plan (QPP)
      • Canada Pension Plan (CPP)
      • Old Age Security Pension (OAS)
    • Personal investments and assets
      • Calculate your investment income.
      • Add your net rental property income.
      • Consider the sale of some assets:
        • Rental property
        • Principal residence
        • Secondary residence or other
Income based on age at time of retirement
Age at time of retirement Québec Pension Plan or Canada Pension Plan Old Age Security Pension (depending on date of birth) Pension Plan
Before April 1958 May 1958 to January 1962 February 1962 or later
Under age 60 No
benefits
As per the terms of the pension plan
Between age 60 and 65 Reduced
benefits
No
benefits
At age 65 Prescribed
benefits
No
benefits
Between age 65 and 67 Increased
benefits
Prescribed
benefits
No
benefits
At age 67 Increased
benefits
Prescribed
benefits
After age 67 Increased
benefits
  • Expenses at retirement
    • Calculate your expenses for each retirement plan.
    • Include the benefits your currently receive from your employer and that you want to keep after retirement (.g., deluxe car, golf club membership or other).
    • Build a reserve for unexpected expenses (e.g., health care, specialized housing)
    • Allow for inflation and income taxes during your retirement.
  • Spread between income and expenses
    • A negative spread means you will have to supplement with:
      • your savings and investments
      • some of your personal assets (RRSP, RRIF, TFSA)
    • This budget exercise will let you know how much you'll need to save before you retire.
  • Optimize your portfolio long-term return potential.
    • Respect your investor profile.
    • Choose incremental investments to:
      • counter market fluctuations.
      • make your capital last beyond your retirement date.
    • Diversify your investments.
  • Choose turn-key investment solutions:
    • Chorus II Portfolios: good diversification in line with investor profile
    • SocieTerra Portfolios: socially responsible investing
    • Zenitude Guaranteed Portfolio: investment solution including capital 100% guaranteed at maturity and a return that is known at time of investment
  • Purchase critical illness insurance to avoid dipping into your savings.
  • Safeguard your quality of life and financial independence in the event of loss of independence.
  • Transfer your business
    • Explore the transfer options and its tax implications for your business.
    • Don't consider the business as your sole retirement capital.
  • Professional activities
    • Decide whether you will stop working gradually or at once.
    • Decide which activities you'll pursue when you retire.
  • Decide what you'll do:
    • travel
    • volunteer and community work
    • studies
    • sports and leisure
    • moving (e.g., to a condo, senior's home, cottage)
    • second career, consultation or part-time work
  • Don't underestimate certain events:
    • Selling your business: price and financing terms.
    • Shares of your business: expected income
    • Retirement span: this could be 15, 20 or 30 years, depending on your health and family history
    • Health: Protect your ability to do the things you want to so by guarding against unforeseen events (e.g., critical illness, long-term care facility, home care, private clinics)
    • Return on your investments: protect your assets from inflation and market fluctuations
    • Your spouse: How your spouse's lifestyle and uncertainty will influence your planning.
  • As a business owner or manager, you have a high income, bonuses, dividends and an expense account.
  • These advantages aren't considered recurring income; be sure to consider this when budgeting for retirement.
  • Income sources
    • Retirement capital
      • If you don't have a pension fund, make a distinction between the value of your business and your retirement capital.
    • Calculate the selling or transfer price of our business.
    • If you keep shares in the business, include future dividends.
    • Start an Individual Pension Plan (IPP) that has advantages similar to a defined benefit pension plan.
    • Give yourself a salary that allows you to maximize your RRSP contributions.
    • Government plans
      • Québec Pension Plan (QPP)
      • Canada Pension Plan (CPP)
      • Old Age Security Pension (OAS)
    • Personal investments and assets
      • Calculate your investment income.
      • Add your net rental property income.
      • Consider the sale of some assets:
        • Rental property
        • Principal residence
        • Secondary residence or other
Income based on age at time of retirement
Age at time of retirement Québec Pension Plan or Canada Pension Plan Old Age Security Pension (depending on date of birth) Pension Plan
Before April 1958 May 1958 to January 1962 February 1962 or later
Under age 60 No
benefits
As per the terms of the pension plan
Between age 60 and 65 Reduced
benefits
No
benefits
At age 65 Prescribed
benefits
No
benefits
Between age 65 and 67 Increased
benefits
Prescribed
benefits
No
benefits
At age 67 Increased
benefits
Prescribed
benefits
After age 67 Increased
benefits
  • Expenses at retirement
    • If you belong to a professional order, find out about the benefits offered by the retiree health insurance plan.
    • Build a reserve for unexpected expenses (e.g., health care, specialized housing)
    • Allow for inflation and income taxes during your retirement.
  • Spread between income and expenses
    • A negative spread means you will have to supplement with:
      • your savings and investments
      • some of your personal assets (RRSP, RRIF, TFSA)
    • This budget exercise will let you know how much you'll need to save before you retire.
  • Optimize your portfolio long-term return potential.
    • Respect your investor profile.
    • Choose incremental investments to:
      • counter market fluctuations.
      • make your capital last beyond your retirement date.
    • Diversify your investments.
  • Choose turn-key investment solutions:
    • Chorus II Portfolios: good diversification in line with investor profile
    • SocieTerra Portfolios: socially responsible investing
    • Zenitude Guaranteed Portfolio: investment solution including capital 100% guaranteed at maturity and a return that is known at time of investment
  • Take charge of your financial obligations in case of accident or disability:
    • Select Disability Income1: to offset a loss of income due to disability (non-taxable monthly income)
    • Select Business Expense1: to cover regular business expenses (rent, heating, business tax, etc.)
  • Protect your estate so a major health problem won’t jeopardize your retirement portfolio:
    • Purchase critical illness insurance to avoid dipping into your savings.
    • Protect yourself in case of loss of independence by ensuring you have the financial means to retain control of decisions affecting you and avoid becoming a burden on the state or loved ones.

1. Product of Desjardins Financial Security Life Assurance Company, a provider of life and health insurance and retirement savings products.

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