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Learning how money circulates

  • Age group:
    Students ages 10 to 11
  • When:
    April and May
  • Time required:
    7 hours

Area of learning:

  • Citizenship and community life

Financial skills

  • Understand the money cycle
  • Understand that money is earned by working

Activity summary

Students find out the difference between saving and borrowing and learn about Quebec's socio-historical context in 1900.

Competencies

Table of disciplinary and non-disciplinary competencies

Disciplinary competencies taught

Disciplines Competency Learning progression
Social sciences Understanding the organization of a society in its territory Quebec society in 1900
Mathematics Mathematical reasoning
  • Matching decimal numbers with percentages
  • Adding and subtracting decimal numbers

Disciplinary competencies affected

  • Oral communication

Non-disciplinary competencies

  • Cooperation

Preparation

Students find out the difference between saving and borrowing and learn about Quebec's socio-historical context in 1900.

Task 1 objective

At the end of this task, students will be able to understand the differences between using their savings and borrowing money to make purchases.

Instructions

Questions to ask:
  1. Show the students the video.
  2. Discuss what they know about the circulation of money.

Teacher's notes

  • How do we earn money?
  • What can we do with the money we earn (spend it or save it)?
  • How can we acquire things (with money earned or saved)?
  • What do we do when we buy goods and we don't have enough money to pay for them (we borrow money)?

Task 2 objective

At the end of this task, students will be able to create socio-historical reference points related to the creation of Alphonse Desjardins's cooperative.

Instructions

  1. Divide the students into 6 teams.
  2. Give each team 1 part of the Looking Back on Alphonse Desjardins and Rural Life in 1900 worksheet.
  3. Give the teams time to answer the questions.
  4. Encourage the students to find a photograph to support their research.
  5. Give the teams some time to prepare a presentation for the rest of the group.
  6. Ask each team to present their findings.

Teacher's notes

Execution

Students learn safe financial practices when using payment methods and share them with their peers.

All the documents you need to carry out this activity are in the right-hand column under Useful links.

Task 1: Think about safe financial practices

Task 1 objective

At the end of this task, students will be acquainted with the basics of economics.

This task consists of playing a game that will show students that money circulates, is obtained by working and can be borrowed.

Instructions

  1. Divide the class into 4 or 5 teams so everyone can play. Students can also play in small groups of 5 to 6 players.
  2. Explain the game to the students.
  3. Distribute the material.
  4. Play!

Teacher's notes

  • While playing the cash from the past game, students are managing a village and have to make financial transactions to help the village flourish. They focus on saving and investing to reach their goal. The game ends when a village reaches its goal.
  • Print and cut out the cards and dollars in advance. Print 14 copies of the Dollars page and cut the bills out to ensure you have enough for the entire class.
  • Review the game with the students. What difficulties did they run into? What were the best solutions? What caused the winning village to succeed?
  • At the end of the game, the desired goal is for students to understand that transactions between villages make saving, purchasing and borrowing— the circulation of money—possible.

Evaluation

Students apply the concepts learned by solving a math problem.

Task 1: Evaluate a problem-solving procedure for a complicated problem

Task 1 objective

At the end of this task, students will be able to complete calculations involving decimal numbers in response to a money-related problem.

Instructions

  1. Distribute Mr. Auger's Account Statement sheet to each student.
  2. Read the task description with the students.
  3. Give them time to complete the task.
  4. Collect the copies and correct them using the evaluation grid.

Teacher's notes

None

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